Celebrating the Spirit and News of Monument Mountain

The Maroon Tribune

  • Lady Spartans Fall to Granby Rams in Western Mass

  • Swim Team Finds Success at States

  • Pres. to Hold A Joint Senate Meeting Today

A Guide on HDR Photography

How to get more brightness and shadows in your photographs

Matt Weston, Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






    We live in a digital age. There are more acronyms than ever in our lives.  We look  at our phones and we see SMS, LTE, FT, and, of course, LOL. Some of you may have even noticed HDR in the top hand corner on your iphones as you go to take a photograph.  

    I know what you’re thinking… HDR, what does that mean? It actually stands for High Dynamic Range.  On Iphones it is set to automatic.  This means while you’re taking a still shot your phone actually has taken more than one picture.  Your phone pieces together multiple images, including underexposed pictures and overexposed pictures and comes out with this one HDR photograph.  This process allows you to capture all the shadows and highlights of the real world.

    HDR is not specific to Iphones; cameras are able to manually take them and then use programs to piece together the different pictures.  At Monument we actually have access to one of the easiest programs to create HDR photographs because “Lightroom” is accessible on Mac in Mr. Webber’s room.  Most people generally think of Lightroom as a program to touch up photos, but it will combine your pictures too.  

    On a manual camera you can bracket your photos, meaning you take some that are underexposed and some that are over exposed.  You do this by adjusting the shutter on the camera in between each photo.  Some cameras also have auto bracketing to get the perfect increments between each picture (on Nikon this button is located on the side of the camera).  

    Once imported from the camera, Lightroom takes care of the rest.  Simply select the group of pictures you want to merge and then click “photomerge, HDR.”  Here Lightroom will deghost the photo, fixing any inconsistencies in them and will combine all the lights and darks from the 3 to 5 pictures.  Then Lightroom, like any other picture, allows you to adjust the photo even more.  

 

Steps

  1. Turn on bracketing

2. Adjust the light meter so it is centered

3. Take 3-5 pictures and the camera will automatically underexpose some and overexpose some.

4. Upload photos to Lightroom

5. Once in Lightroom select the 3 or 5 photos by hitting one, holding down shift then hitting the last photo

6. After being selected go to Photo > Photomerge > HDR

7. Here the pictures will be added to form one.  You can select the amount you wish to deghost, then finalize the photo.  The photo will be stored under a new file and all previous ones will remain saved.  

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • A Guide on HDR Photography

    Breaking News

    On Display in the Library

  • A Guide on HDR Photography

    Breaking News

    One Page at a Time

  • A Guide on HDR Photography

    Breaking News

    Principal Marianne Young Retiring

  • A Guide on HDR Photography

    Local News

    11 Questions with Emma Wilber

  • Breaking News

    Civics’ Students Mock Accident Rescheduled

  • A Guide on HDR Photography

    Local News

    Q&A with Molly Stephen

  • A Guide on HDR Photography

    Editorials

    A Bittersweet Ending

  • A Guide on HDR Photography

    Arts & Entertainment

    Q & A with Elinor Cherin

  • Breaking News

    The Eastern Conference Finals

  • Local News

    The Hunt for the hardware

Celebrating the Spirit and News of Monument Mountain
A Guide on HDR Photography