Celebrating the Spirit and News of Monument Mountain

The Maroon Tribune

  • Lady Spartans Fall to Granby Rams in Western Mass

  • Swim Team Finds Success at States

  • Pres. to Hold A Joint Senate Meeting Today

Principal Marianne Young Retiring

Veteran educator Marianne Young is retiring after 16 years as Monument’s principal. Mrs. Young reflects on her beginnings in education, issues at the school, and what makes Monument so special.

Molly Stephen, Maroon Tribune Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






 

What has been your proudest moment while working at Monument? Oh my gosh, so many! That’s a really good question. My first year, students wanted to boycott the MCAS and we found a way to work with students through that and I think that that’s a proud moment for me because the faculty and students worked together. Every time we come up against a situation that is challenging for students and teachers and we find a way to work together through it, makes me as proud as the last time. So, that way our students supported one another; a couple of years ago with them leading the transgender issue and getting everyone to be treated equally. The way our students and teachers responded this year to issues around race. There are so many over the years… Community Unity, kids coming together, there are a lot.

Throughout this year, you had to deal with a lot of race issues at Monument. What made you want to pursue this and do you think you resolved it? What makes me want to keep working on it is that if one student–any student in this building– felt like they didn’t matter and you know, you and I have had conversations about your experience. If you walk away from here thinking that I didn’t try on your behalf, that’s not okay. But I also knew this year that racism was an issue because it comes up off and on, like every now and again it – it’s always there and then it shows up as a big issue and I wanted to set up something that becomes part of the way we are at Monument and so the Race Focus Group [was formed]. So, I do think that we’ve done some good work around this, that we spent a lot of time this year doing different things to keep it from being a flash in the pan and now it’s going to depend on the teachers and students and the next principal to keep it going.

What has been your greatest challenge while working at Monument? Trying to not leave anybody behind because I think school – it matters that every student feels like there’s something here and that can be really hard to do and can be frustrating for people, so making sure every student has a spot, but then respecting the faculty too, that they feel like they’re being given the same opportunity. So, I think balance, always balancing. I think we’ve done a really good job, but I also think there’s always room for improvement.

Where did you work prior to Monument? I was an English teacher and middle school principal at a small rural high school in Vermont. So I started there, and then before that I taught for a couple years in Rhode Island.

I know that you left Monument for a while. What precipitated your return? So, I taught here and was the principal for eight years, left and was the superintendent in Lenox, which was great, and that’s kind of the career path for educators, if you want to be in administration. But what I found was – and I live in Great Barrington, so I’ve always lived and worked in the same town, that’s how it was in Vermont and here– that I missed being part of the community where I lived. I missed students. I missed the energy, and I missed watching, someone like you start as a silent freshmen, to this woman who writes that essay to George Washington and gets in. And when I see you, I know that story because I got to witness it or be a part of it. As the superintendent, the job was one step removed, so I didn’t really know the kids as much.

What do you plan on doing after you leave Monument? I don’t know what’s going to unfold for me, but right now I needed to have something to go to you know, so I am gonna teach at MCLA. I’m going to teach a few classes, nothing full-time. I’m teaching in the educator prep program and then working with people who want to become principals and administrators.

What inspired you to start working in education? My father was a teacher and a principal and then a superintendent and I liked school. I remember in elementary school going to his high school with him and he would be working in his office on a Saturday and I would go wander around the building and go into classrooms and pretend I was teaching. I knew I always wanted to be a teacher, but what really inspired me was my high school English teacher. I was working for a fairly ineffective principal and I noticed that what was clearly in the way of teachers being able to do stuff they wanted, was this principal who couldn’t “see.” That’s when I was inspired to become a principal.

If you could have had any other job besides being an educator, what would it have been? I think one of two things. I would have loved to have been an interior designer; I think that would have been a fun thing to do, but I also think I would have loved being an actress – a stage actress.

Describe yourself in one word. Real.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Principal Marianne Young Retiring

    Breaking News

    On Display in the Library

  • Principal Marianne Young Retiring

    Breaking News

    One Page at a Time

  • Principal Marianne Young Retiring

    Local News

    11 Questions with Emma Wilber

  • Breaking News

    Civics’ Students Mock Accident Rescheduled

  • Principal Marianne Young Retiring

    Local News

    Q&A with Molly Stephen

  • Principal Marianne Young Retiring

    Editorials

    A Bittersweet Ending

  • Principal Marianne Young Retiring

    Arts & Entertainment

    Q & A with Elinor Cherin

  • Breaking News

    The Eastern Conference Finals

  • Local News

    The Hunt for the hardware

  • Principal Marianne Young Retiring

    Arts & Entertainment

    The Reasons Why Not to Watch 13 Reasons Why

Celebrating the Spirit and News of Monument Mountain
Principal Marianne Young Retiring